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Published on January 11, 2018

New EMS Technology for Patients in Cardiac Arrest Now Available in Midland

EMTs demonstrating the new LUCAS technology used for patients in cardiac arrest.MidMichigan Medical Center – Emergency Medical Services Paramedics Martin Peters (left) and Matthew DeBrosse demonstrate how the new LUCAS technology is used for patients in cardiac arrest.

According to the American Heart Association, approximately 790,000 people in the United States have heart attacks each year. Paramedics and EMTs work on a daily basis to save the lives of those suffering from cardiac arrest, and now in Midland, a new technology is helping them to provide more efficient and streamlined care.

The LUCAS™ Chest Compression System is now available in 14 of MidMichigan Medical Center – Emergency Medical Services’ ambulances in both Midland and Gladwin. The system uses the latest scientific guidelines to standardize and mechanically control chest compressions. The devices can be set up on the patient in a matter of seconds, and immediately begin providing life-saving care. The technology was purchased through a donation from the Robert W. Considine Foundation.

In addition to providing 100 chest compressions per minute, the LUCAS system also maintains internal pressure and provides circulation, allowing vital organs to remain functional until the patient arrives at the hospital.

“This system is key in saving the lives of those suffering from cardiac arrest,” said Scott Shawl, manager of MidMichigan Medical Center – Emergency Medical Services in Midland. “It is a challenge for paramedics and EMTs to consistently perform chest compressions over long durations of time. With the LUCAS system, patients will get efficient, effective care, and our first responders will be able to focus on other life-saving tasks in order to provide the best possible care.”

One such task that paramedics and EMTs may be performing is contacting MidMichigan Medical Center - Midland to ensure they are prepared to start treating the patient as soon as the ambulance arrives. Each ambulance is also equipped with a visual camera and tablet that is linked directly to the Medical Center’s Emergency Department, allowing first responders to communicate the needs of the patient directly to the health care providers awaiting the patient’s arrival.