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Published on February 26, 2018

Behavioral Health Patients and Newborns Benefiting from Eagle Scout Service Project

Blankets made as part of Eagle Scout project.Gideon Pierce and Mickey Dexter, nursing director, inpatient Behavioral Health Unit, MidMichigan Medical Center – Midland, hold one of the numerous fleece tied blankets that Gideon donated through his Eagle Scout Service project. The blankets are comforting patients receiving inpatient care for behavioral health issues and new parents welcoming the birth of their infants at MidMichigan Medical Center – Midland.

Patients receiving inpatient care for behavioral health issues and new parents welcoming the birth of their infants at MidMichigan Medical Center – Midland are benefiting from a local young man’s Eagle Scout project.

Gideon Pierce, 17, from Midland and a member of Boy Scout Troop #787, organized the making of approximately 40 fleece tied blankets ranging from vibrant prints to soothing children-themed backgrounds.

“We are thrilled that Gideon chose to help comfort our patients in this way,” said Mickey Dexter, R.N., director, Behavioral Health Unit, MidMichigan Medical Center – Midland. “These patients are in crisis and to have someone care enough to reach out to them in this way means so much to not only the patients but their families as well. We are all so grateful.”

Blankets have also been given to the Medical Center’s Maternal Child Health Unit to help welcome new births.

“The parents love these blankets for their infants,” said Susan Gunn, B.S.N., R.N., manager, Maternal Child Health Unit, MidMichigan Medical Center – Midland. “For some it is one of the first gifts they are receiving to celebrate the birth of their child which makes it even extra special.”

Gideon, the son of Sharon and Paul Pierce, followed in the footsteps of his five older brothers who all participated in scouting and also earned the rank of Eagle Scout, the Boy Scouts of America’s highest advancement rank. Approximately only six percent of eligible Scouts earn the Eagle Scout award.

“Scouting has been a big part of my family,” said Gideon. “I have enjoyed all that it has provided and the lessons that it has taught me. I know scouting has made me a better person and I hope to carry those values with me the rest of my life.”

Those interested in more information about supporting patient care may contact the MidMichigan Health Foundation at (989) 839-1932 or by visiting www.midmichigan.org/donations.