Behavioral Health Unit

Fast Facts

  • Average Daily Census FY2020 
    26.11
  • Nurse to PT Ratio
    1:6
  • PCT to Pt Ratio
    6:1
  • Shifts
    Traditional 12 hrs; 7 a.m. - 7 p.m., 7 p.m. - 7 a.m.
  • Certifications Available
    BLS, CPI, RN-PC

The Behavioral Health Unit sees patients from 18 years of age and up. We specialize in geriatric psychiatry and see many patients with Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as patients with many other mental health diagnoses. Gratiot has the largest Behavioral Health unit within the MidMichigan Health family. We keep an occupancy rate above 90% and are known throughout the state for the great care we deliver to our patients.

Our nurses exhibit great teamwork every day in helping the patients with their diagnosis and ways to help cope with their disease. We also have a great team of therapists who work with the patients and help them develop the coping skills needed for them to function at a high level once discharged. Our nurses are trained in dementia care as well as verbal deescalation techniques to help keep everyone safe and free from harm on the unit. 

We offer daily groups the patients can participate in, the therapists and nurses do a great job of developing a therapeutic rapport with all their patients. Nursing staff is great about encouraging the patients socialize and attend the groups we offer. 

The Behavioral Health Unit encourages professional growth; we also encourage participation on our Unit Practice Council. This helps the nursing staff have a voice to help our unit focus on great outcomes for our patients that we serve. New nurses are paired with an existing nurse and are given 4 to 6 weeks training on the unit.

What Our Employees are Saying

  • I like the people I work with, my supervisor, and manager. I appreciate that I’m heard and my concerns are addressed. This facility is open, airy and I like that the patients have private rooms. The air is always fresh.” — Sherry Root, L.P.N.

  • We are a family, we back each other up. I never feel alone.” — Majorie Borie, B.S.N., R.N.

  •  “I like when we discharge a patient with a positive outcome. It’s about doing the little things for the patients to brighten their day.” — Lisa Goostrey, R.N.